Captain Scott's Terra Nova Hut
Cape Evans, Ross Island

Scott’s Hut was built during Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s British Antarctic Terra Nova Expedition of 1910-13. Scott had initially camped near the site for a night in January 1904, naming it ‘Skuary’ after the number of skuas found there. The expedition arrived at Cape Evans in January 1911 and began constructing the prefabricated hut which was completed by April. On Terra Nova’s return in February 1912 an annex and stables were added. A telephone line was also installed connecting to the Discovery Hut, but this was washed out to sea in March 1912. Over the winter of 1912 the hut suffered from several small fires. When the expedition left in January 1913 they left the hut with enough supplies for a dozen men to survive for over a year.

1915
Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party

The hut was next inhabited by Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party in May 1915. They were stranded with limited supplies after their ship Aurora was blown out to sea. Using Cape Adare as their winter quarters and main base, the party completed their depot laying for Shackleton’s planned crossing of the continent, using much of the supplies left behind to survive. With the return of Aurora in January 1917, the hut was closed up and not entered again for thirty years.

1947
US Operation Highjump

Scott’s Hut was not visited again until 1947 when the US Operation Highjump took place, followed by more regular visits from 1955. The hut was designated as Historic Site and Monument HSM no. 16 in 1972 at the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting. It now has the highest level of protection as part of Antarctic Specially Protected Area (ASPA) 155.

2008 Onwards
Conservation

In 2008 the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust (NZAHT) completed a seven year conservation programme to save the site. In 2012 NZAHT had completed a five year carpentry conservation programme, which included weatherproofing the building and making it structurally sound. By 2015 a seven year artefact conservation project was also completed, with more than 11,000 artefacts preserved on site. A maintenance fund has been established to enable ongoing work. For more information about the site and a virtual tour visit the NZAHT website

Captain Scott

Learn more about Captain Robert F Scott and his expeditions to Antarctica.

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